Where You Lead, 2012-13

Where You Lead, 2012

Glazed porcelain   5” x 5” x ¾

                                                                                 

Hear and There, 2012

Glazed porcelain   5” x 7” x ¾”  

                                                                                 

Alone Together, 2013

Glazed porcelain   5 ½” x 8” x ¾”

                                                                                 

I Will Follow, 2013

Glazed porcelain   5” x 7” x ¾”

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Undertow, 2012-13

Undertow, 2012-13

Glazed porcelain. Installation dimensions. 7” x 54” x 3”

Inspired by the figures of two children dancing among a tide of beleaguered grownups in Lorado Taft’s 1920 “Fountain of Time” on the edge of Washington Park on the South Side of Chicago. Thirteen figures cast from a cloth-bodied child doll, prance across a wall at floor level. Two mimic the poses of Taft’s dancing children; others echo poses found in photos of displaced children dancing in unlikely circumstance around the world. Apparently oblivious to human struggle, dismissed and yet underfoot, they tug toward the future.

Always With You, 2012

Always With You, 2012

Glazed porcelain, splashed iron. 8” x 7” x ¾”

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Home Sick, 2011

Home Sick, 2011

Sterling silver, bronze, porcelain, cast iron, sheet lead
24 castings each approx. 1 ¼ ” x 2 ½” x 2″
Chair 32.5″x16.5″x17.5″; Bags @ approx. 11″x5″x3″

Home Sick, a retrospective installation, presented a complete collection of forty-eight pair of metal dental casts, each resting on an individual porcelain niche-shelf. The casts chronicle the falling out and growing in of a pair of siblings’ teeth over a seven-year period. The sister’s collection of teeth, cast in silver, is called Tooth for a Tooth; the brother’s, cast in bronze, is called Cheek by Jowl. The teeth are souvenir relics serving as a memoir and memorial of childhood from a mother’s perspective. The maternal self-portrait, Dear as Salt, a cast iron chair standing askew with one leg lifted on two cast iron lunch bags, accompanied the collection of teeth. The installation closed with two piles of sheet lead plaques that record the siblings’ days spent home sick in the course of a year.

 

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Soft Touch, 2006

Soft Touch, 2006                                                                                                         

Cast iron, cast porcelain, painted wood

Installation dimensions variable; blocks @ 12″x12″x12″

Twelve iron casts of a small girl’s hand rest on foot square painted wood blocks. Each hand touches a plain female peg doll, slip cast in porcelain and jointed with white embroidery thread. The installation reflects on moments of reversal when a daughter’s strength surpasses that of her mother.

Soft Touch premiered at Soho20 Chelsea as part of “Soft Touch/Wondering Eye”, a collaborative exhibition with the artist’s father, R. Darrel Bock, who offered a selection from his life’s work in art photography on the surrounding walls.

 

 “Soft Touch/Wondering Eye” exhibition catalog, with introductory essay by Zofia Burr  http://monicabock.com/soft_touch.pdfSaveSave

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Without Irreverence at Soho20, May/June 2013

Tue, May 21, 2013 – Sat, Jun 15, 2013

SOHO20 CHELSEA GALLERY
547 West 27th St. Suite 301
NEW YORK, NY 10001
T. 212.367.8994
F. 212.367.8984
info@soho20gallery.com

Free admission (all visitors, all hours)

Opening Reception May 23, 2013 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm

Press ReleaseMailer

SOHO20 Chelsea presents “Without Irreverence,” new ceramic sculpture by Monica Bock. In To the Light House, Virginia Woolf suggests that, “A mother and child may be reduced to a shadow without irreverence.” Woolf’s novel of reconciliation, built on memories of familial loss and regeneration, is the initial inspiration for Monica Bock’s recent sculptural work using hand-altered glazed porcelain slip castings of a mother-daughter pair of early-twentieth century style dollhouse figures. Striking poses based on iconic temple acrobats, sky goddesses and divas, or succumbing to the weight of their own skins, Bock’s mothers and daughters dance en masse and gather in small conversations across the gallery walls, at once bound by and set free from the consequences of their intimacy.

 

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Separation Anxiety at Pelham Art Center, February/March 2012

My Postpartum Miniature and portions of Don’t Forget the Lunches included in Separation Anxiety at the Pelham Art Center through March 31, 2012. A number of other wonderful artists making art about the emotional complexities of childhood and childrearing…

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